PPP Mentor Connect


Speak with people who understand

When you have a rare genetic condition like Primary Periodic Paralysis (PPP), it can be difficult finding support and guidance. You are not alone. PPP Mentor Connect can put you in touch with a person taking KEVEYIS who may understand what you’re going through and who can share their medical journey and personal experience with you. Whether you are an adult with PPP or an adult caregiver of an adult with PPP, you can connect with an understanding mentor.

John didn’t sit back, he took control of his PPP journey

No one in John’s family talked about their family history of sudden paralysis, which caused John to feel alone and stigmatized. He felt that way most of his life as he continued to deal with it on his own.

John accepted it as part of his reality, but refused to accept feeling helpless about it. Instead, he took control of the situation and began reading journals to educate himself. Eventually, he was diagnosed with PPP and began looking for ways to move forward with his life.

In time, his daughter was also diagnosed with PPP. It made John work even harder. His efforts to stay informed led him to a PPP conference where he learned about KEVEYIS. Since starting on KEVEYIS, the number of his episodes has decreased. Initially, John felt dizzy after starting KEVEYIS, but he worked with his doctor to find a way to manage it. John wants everyone living with PPP to know that they are not alone in their journey.

Careful research and conversations with her doctor led Kim to KEVEYIS

Kim has suffered from PPP for as long as she can remember. Her own father was diagnosed with PPP, so when he found Kim lying in her crib unable to move, he suspected she had it, too. At the time, their local hospital was unable to diagnose Kim, so she went untreated for many years. Finally, when Kim was 17, she received the official PPP diagnosis.

After learning about KEVEYIS, Kim started researching and provided all of the information to her doctor. Together, they decided KEVEYIS would be a good option for Kim, and now she feels like she has greater control over her PPP symptoms. Kim did have some tingling in her fingers and lips, as well as blurry vision, but these side effects subsided in time.

Kim believes this condition has made her stronger in so many ways. She believes in her own capabilities and wants to encourage other patients to never stop learning and remind them that they aren’t alone.

Learn how an advocate made a difference for Leslie

When Leslie was 13, she started experiencing PPP symptoms. While asleep, her whole body cramped up, and she would wake up unable to move. One day, Leslie was rushed to the hospital with elevated potassium levels after going to a clinic with flu-like symptoms. Eventually, Leslie’s mom got her to a neurologist who diagnosed her with PPP.

Leslie’s mom is a former nurse and, Leslie says, her biggest advocate. She was the one who first heard about KEVEYIS and mentioned it to Leslie’s neurologist. Together, he and Leslie decided to try it out. When Leslie first started taking KEVEYIS she noticed a tingling feeling in her face, but she worked with her doctor on managing that side effect. Since starting on KEVEYIS, Leslie has been able to manage her symptoms and has had fewer PPP episodes.

Advocating for herself: Janine’s efforts led to answers

Janine spent years receiving misdiagnosis after misdiagnosis. All the while, she was experiencing episodes of muscle paralysis that were becoming more frequent and severe, signaling that her condition was getting worse. Her episodes of paralysis started to impact her daily life, affecting her ability to perform her job, causing coworkers to suspect she was faking an illness. Eventually, her progressive condition forced her into an early retirement.

After decades of suffering from puzzling symptoms, Janine finally had a breakthrough. She noticed that she was having problems swallowing during mealtime, which she explained to her doctor. Running out of answers and options, he prescribed a potassium supplement. Much to their surprise, Janine’s symptoms improved and she even began to see reductions in the frequency of her episodes of paralysis.

This sudden improvement inspired Janine to do research, and she discovered that there were more people like herself who had a condition called Primary Periodic Paralysis. At this point, everything started to make more sense. Janine brought her notes to the doctor, who was not familiar with PPP and was amazed by the information. Janine began adjusting her lifestyle and started on therapy. Unfortunately, the initial treatment was ineffective. When Janine was prescribed KEVEYIS, the frequency and severity of her paralytic episodes were reduced, and she was finally able to manage her daily life. She worked closely with her doctor to individualize her dosing regimen.

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Indication and Important Safety Information

What is KEVEYIS?

KEVEYIS (pronounced keh-VAY-iss) (dichlorphenamide) is a prescription drug used to treat primary hyperkalemic periodic paralysis, primary hypokalemic periodic paralysis, and other similar diseases.

What should you tell your healthcare provider before taking KEVEYIS?

Tell your doctor if you are allergic to dichlorphenamide or other sulfa drugs; if you take high doses of aspirin, or if you have lung or liver disease; if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed.

What should you know about KEVEYIS?

  • Severe allergic and other reactions have happened with sulfonamides (drugs such as KEVEYIS) and have sometimes been fatal. Stop taking KEVEYIS at the first sign of skin rash, swelling, difficulty breathing, or any other unexpected side effect or reaction, and call 911 right away.
  • Tell your healthcare provider if you take aspirin or if another healthcare provider instructs you to begin taking aspirin. High doses of aspirin should not be taken with KEVEYIS.
  • KEVEYIS can cause your body to lose potassium, which can lead to heart problems. Your healthcare provider will measure the potassium levels in your blood before you start treatment and at certain times during treatment.
  • Tell your healthcare provider about all other prescription and over-the-counter medicines you take, including supplements, as some medicines can interact with KEVEYIS.
  • While taking KEVEYIS, your body may produce too much acid or may not be able to remove acid from the body. Your healthcare provider may run tests on a regular basis to check for signs of acid buildup.
  • KEVEYIS may increase your risk of falling. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you experience a fall while taking KEVEYIS.
  • The risks of falls and acid buildup are greater in elderly patients.
  • It is not known whether KEVEYIS is safe or effective for people younger than 18 years of age.

What are the most common side effects with KEVEYIS?

The most common side effects are a feeling of numbness, tingling or burning (“pins and needles”) in the toes, feet, hands or fingers; trouble with memory or thinking; feeling confused; and unpleasant taste in the mouth.

These are not all of the possible side effects of KEVEYIS. Call your healthcare provider for medical advice about side effects. You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.